Member Art Galleries

Exhibit at the Court House

 

CCAI Courthouse Gallery

Visual Oasis: Works from Creative Growth
Exhibition at CCAI Courthouse Gallery

Reception: Friday, June 1, 5 – 7pm
Exhibition: June 1 – September 27, 2018

at the CCAI Courthouse Gallery
885 E Musser Street, Carson City, Nevada

The Capital City Arts Initiative [CCAI] presents its group show, Visual Oasis: Works from Creative Growth, at the CCAI Courthouse Gallery. CCAI will host an opening reception on Friday, June 1, 5-7pm. The exhibition with art by 17 artists will be in the gallery from June 1 – September 27, 2018.

The Courthouse is located at 885 E Musser Street, Carson City. The reception and the exhibition are free and the public is cordially invited. The gallery is open Monday – Friday, 8am – 5pm.

Creative Growth Art Center in Oakland, CA, describes itself as “the oldest and largest nonprofit art center for adults with developmental, mental, and physical disabilities. Since 1974, Creative Growth has played a significant role in increasing public interest in the artistic capabilities and achievements of people with disabilities, providing a professional studio environment for artistic development, gallery exhibitions and representation, and a social atmosphere among peers.” Learn more about CGAC at www.creativegrowth.org/

CGAC’s large multi-room studio serves over 140 client artists weekly with instruction by professional artists in fiber arts, sculpture, painting, ceramics, printmaking, drawing, photography, and video animation. The Center’s gallery presents eight group shows annually making the prolific artists’ work available to the public year-round. CGAC continues to contract with Target stores for product design.

Visual Oasis: Works from Creative Growth includes mixed media and 3-D art by: Jo Beal, Susan Glikbarg, Cedric Johnson, John Martin, Paulino Martin, Donald Mitchell, Julie Swartout, Christine Szeto, and Ed Walters. Mixed media and 2-D works include pieces by Marion Bolton, Kerry Daminanakes, Joseph Fagnani, Franna Lusson, Miguel Palacios, Tony Pedemonte, Ruth Stafford, and Merritt Wallace. Three of these artists’ bios follow.

Kerry Daminanakes’ uses pastel on paper to create her energetic, expressionistic, and compelling drawings of food with accompanying text/recipes. Her work has been shown widely in the Bay Area and in Korea. In 2014, she was the recipient of the Wynn Newhouse Award, a grant awarded by the Samuel I. Newhouse Foundation to artists of excellence that happen to have disabilities.

Merritt Wallace’s shares his vision of busy and crowded city life with his imaginative urban maps including numbers, arrows, coffee monsters, and more. Merritt’s drawings served as inspiration for fashion designer Erica Tanov’s 2013 Spring/Summer collection of clothing and home goods. His art has been exhibited internationally in New York, Berlin, Paris, and Korea.

Tony Pedemonte works with wooden armatures or repurposed items like bicycle wheels, wrapping with one spool of thread after another until the structural frame is nearly concealed. Distinguished by their smooth texture, a monochromatic palette, and geometrically-driven configurations, Pedemonte’s sculptures exude a presence that is both tactile and enigmatic. His work has been shown in San Francisco, New York, Miami, and Paris.

Essay writers Andreana Donahue and Tim Ortiz are co-founders of Disparate Minds, an interdisciplinary project dedicated to increasing visibility and discussing the work of marginalized self-taught artists. They are co-authors of the multiple essays discussing work by people with disabilities published at their site, disparateminds.org. Through their research, writing, lectures, and curatorial projects, Donahue and Ortiz share their insights informed by extensive experience in this field as practicing artists, artist facilitators, and dedicated disability rights advocates.

Donahue was awarded a Fellowship in Visual Art from the Nevada Arts Council in 2018. She shows her art nationally and lives in Las Vegas. Ortiz works as a home/community-based personal care provider for adults with developmental disabilities; he exhibits his art nationally and lives in Grinnell, Iowa.

This exhibition is supported by lead donations from Carson Miller and from Nancy Raven.

The Capital City Arts Initiative is an artist-centered organization committed to the encouragement and support of artists and the arts and culture of Carson City and the surrounding region. The Initiative is committed to community building for the area’s diverse adult and youth populations through art projects and exhibitions, live events, arts education programs, artist residencies, and online projects.

CCAI is funded in part by the John Ben Snow Memorial Trust, National Endowment for the Arts, Nevada Arts Council, Carson City Cultural Commission, NV Energy Foundation, U.S. Bank Foundation, Nevada Humanities and National Endowment for the Humanities, and John and Grace Nauman Foundation.

top image: Kerry Damianakes, “Cream of Tomato Soup for Lunch”, pastel on paper, 15″x22″, 2012
bottom image: exhibition flier



 

Jenny Raven: The Creative Growth Years 1979 – 1984
Exhibition at the Sierra Room

 

 

Reception: Friday, August 17, 5 – 7pm
Exhibition: July 2 – October 18, 2018
at the Sierra Room, Community Center
851 E William Street, Carson City, Nevada

 

 

 

Jenny Raven: The Creative Growth Years
Exhibition at the Sierra Room

Reception: Friday, August 17, 5 – 7pm
Exhibition: July 2 – October 18, 2018
at the CCAI Courthouse Gallery
885 E Musser Street, Carson City, Nevada

 

The Capital City Arts Initiative [CCAI] presents its exhibition, Jenny Raven: The Creative Growth Years 1979 – 1984 with artwork by artist Jenny Raven in the city’s Community Center Sierra Room, 851 E William Street, Carson City. The exhibition is available to the public from July 2 – October 18, 2018. CCAI will host an exhibition reception on Friday, August 17, 5-7pm in the Sierra Room.

Jenny Raven lived in San Diego, California, until the middle 70s. Following surgery for a brain tumor that left her disabled with limited short-term memory, her family moved to Berkeley, California. There she was able to access purpose and artistic guidance at Creative Growth Art Center. Raven worked in a variety of media, but she preferred drawing with pen and ink. During the last five years of her life, she thrived as an artist at CGAC.

CCAI is proud to show Raven’s work — with thanks to Nancy Raven, her mother, who resides in Minden, Nevada. Raven’s exhibition is a companion show to Visual Oasis: Works from Creative Growth, a survey of art in the CCAI Courthouse Gallery.

The Creative Growth Art Center in Oakland, CA, describes itself as “the oldest and largest nonprofit art center for adults with developmental, mental, and physical disabilities. Since 1974, Creative Growth has played a significant role in increasing public interest in the artistic capabilities and achievements of people with disabilities, providing a professional studio environment for artistic development, gallery exhibitions and representation, and a social atmosphere among peers.” Learn more about CGAC at www.creativegrowth.org/

CGAC’s large multi-room studio serves over 140 client artists weekly with instruction by professional artists in fiber arts, sculpture, painting, ceramics, printmaking, drawing, photography, and video animation. The Center’s gallery presents eight group shows annually making the prolific artists’ work available to the public year-round. CGAC continues to contract with Target stores for product design.

Essay writers Andreana Donahue and Tim Ortiz are co-founders of Disparate Minds, an interdisciplinary project dedicated to increasing visibility and discussing the work of marginalized self-taught artists. They are co-authors of the multiple essays discussing work by people with disabilities published at their site, disparateminds.org. Through their research, writing, lectures, and curatorial projects, Donahue and Ortiz share their insights informed by extensive experience in this field as practicing artists, artist facilitators, and dedicated disability rights advocates.

Donahue was awarded a Fellowship in Visual Art from the Nevada Arts Council in 2018. She shows her art nationally and lives in Las Vegas. Ortiz works as a home/community-based personal care provider for adults with developmental disabilities; he exhibits his art nationally and lives in Iowa.

The Sierra Room is open to the public during Carson City official meetings including the first/third Thursdays, 8am – 5pm, and many weeknights Monday – Thursday, 5pm – 8pm. For Sierra Room access, call 775.283.7421 or check meeting schedules online at www.carson.org/government/meetings-and-events

This exhibition is supported by lead donations from Carson Miller and from Nancy Raven.

The Capital City Arts Initiative is an artist-centered organization committed to the encouragement and support of artists and the arts and culture of Carson City and the surrounding region. The Initiative is committed to community building for the area’s diverse adult and youth populations through art projects and exhibitions, live events, arts education programs, artist residencies, and online projects.

CCAI is funded in part by the John Ben Snow Memorial Trust, National Endowment for the Arts, Nevada Arts Council, Carson City Cultural Commission, NV Energy Foundation, U.S. Bank Foundation, Nevada Humanities and National Endowment for the Humanities, and John and Grace Nauman Foundation.

image: exhibition flier


ART from UNR
CCAI Student Exhibition at the Brick

Exhibition: July 11, 2017 – present 
at the Community Development Building [the Brick]
108 E Proctor Street, Carson City, Nevada

The Capital City Arts Initiative [CCAI] presents its student exhibition, ART from UNR, at the Community Development Building [the Brick], 108 E Proctor Street, Carson City. The Brick is open to the public daily, 8am – noon, 1-4pm. The free exhibition will remain in the building’s lobby exhibition space from July 11 through October 19.

This past semester, thirty-six University of Nevada, Reno [UNR] students collaborated to create two large sculptures inspired by Louise Nevelson, one of America’s most distinguished artists. Each student built a wood box and created their own composition of gathered found-wood pieces; the boxes were then combined into the large sculptures. Nevelson provides the inspiration for students to explore formal elements of sculpture – mass, plane, line, color, and texture, along with compositional elements including positive and negative space, directional quality, and repetition.

The project also gives students the opportunity for hands-on experience in the wood shop and general sculpture studio utilizing both stationary tools (i.e. table saw, panel saw, band saw, miter saw, drill press, etc.) and hand tools (i.e. hammers, hand saws, drills, brad guns, etc.)

The students who created the Composition in White include: Shane Andrews, Denae Ball, Holly Carter, Owen Craugh, Celeste Dunn, Barrie Fenton, Kyle Hoffman, Tyler Jessell, Sandra Kramp, Tatum Lochner, Makenna Mahar I, Joseph Oliva, Isabel Olmedo, Rayne Roberts, Amanda Singleton, Tyler Stanley, Julia Stead, Samantha Vanillo, and Dustin Waters.

The students who created the Composition in Black include: Christopher DeFalco, Lindsey Depaola, Yvette Diaz, Rebekah Dominik, Griffin Drew, Laura Gracia, Joseph Klippenstein, Martha Rebecca Lopez, Courtney Martinez, Brianna Oki, Isabel Pittman, Nico Quatrale, Gabriel Rojas, Kevin Ruano, Kaleigh Rubio, Tyler Scranton, and Demetria Smolko.

Beginning Sculpture at the University of Nevada, Reno fulfills a component of the University’s Core Curriculum, specifically the Fine Arts Core Objective. The Fine Arts Core Objective is meant to develop an understanding of human creative practice and provide the student with an informed appreciation of the world’s visual and performing arts artistic heritage, both historical and contemporary. The Fine Arts Core Objective equips students to recognize the crucial role the arts play in shaping our experiences in and understandings of the world.

There are no prerequisites for students to enroll in Beginning Sculpture. As a result, many if not most of the students enrolled have never taken an art class before and are coming to this course from diverse fields of study such as Psychology, Engineering, Biology, and Geology, just to name a few examples from this past year. The Louise Nevelson wood construction sculpture project synthesizes and integrates information from contemporary and historical art in an applied studio art environment in order to contribute to the creative and scholarly experience of students from across the university.

The course was guided by Art Department Associate Professor Tamara Scronce, who was awarded the University’s prestigious Tibbits Distinguished Teacher Award for excellence in teaching this spring. Instructor and grad student Cullen Wegman taught the Composition in Black course section. Instructor Kevin Kremler taught the Composition in White course section; he earned a MFA at the university in 2012.

The Capital City Arts Initiative is an artist-centered organization committed to the encouragement and support of artists and the arts and culture of Carson City and the surrounding region. The Initiative is committed to community building for the area’s diverse adult and youth populations through art projects and exhibitions, live events, arts education programs, artist residencies, and its online projects.

CCAI is funded in part by John Ben Snow Memorial Trust, Nevada Arts Council and National Endowment for the Arts, City of Carson City, Nevada Humanities and National Endowment for the Humanities, NV Energy Foundation, U.S. Bank Foundation, and John and Grace Nauman Foundation.

top image: Composition in White; sculptures by 17 students; wood, glue, found objects, paint; 2017
2nd image: Composition in Black; sculptures by 19 students; wood, glue, found objects, paint; 2017
3rd image: Composition in White, detail; wood, glue, found objects, paint; 2017
bottom image: ART from UNR exhibition flier

Nevada Artists Association at the Brewery Arts Center.



Nevada Artists Association Gallery

 Brewery Arts Center

Regular Members Show

New Years Show runs from January 14-February 16

Winter Show Runs from February 18-March 30

Spring Has Sprung show runs from April 1-May 4

Landscape Show runs from May 6-June 15

Photography Show runs in July

Autumn Show runs in August

Nevada Day Show runs in September-October-November

The NAA gallery is located at Carson City’s Brewery Arts Center complex.  The Gallery is open Tuesday through Sunday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission is free and all art is for sale. Go to www.nevadaartists.org for more.

 



Nevada Arts Council OS X Gallery

MOUNTAIN PICASSOS: Basque Arborglyphs of the Great Basin
July 30—Sept 7, 2018

Reception & Talk: Tuesday, August 28, 2018, 5:30 to 7:30 PM, Artist Talk @ 6:15 PM
Sponsored by Smith’s Food & Drug Stores, Inc.

Basque tree carvings, or “arborglyphs,” have long been of interest to historians, Basque scholars, foresters, and hikers. These carvings have been extensively documented in Nevada and California with photographs and through cultural asset mapping.

For more than half a century, Jean and Phillip Earl of Reno used clues from old maps, letters, and books to hunt for and document “Mountain Picassos,” distinctive figures carved into aspen trees found in the high country meadows of the Great Basin. These figures, along with names, dates, and sayings, were carved by Basque sheepherders in the early to mid- 20th century. Jean Earl evolved a unique method of preserving the carvings using canvas and artists’ wax to create rubbings, two dimensional representations of the carvings that are works of art themselves, eventually assembling over 130 wax-on-muslin rubbings made directly from the carvings. Mountain Picassos explores the unexpected intersection of art, culture, and nature.

This exhibit comprises 26 of these rubbings— along with text panels, contextual photographs, and streaming video. It provides a rare opportunity to see some of the intimate personal images inscribed by Basque sheepherders in the aspen groves of the Great Basin during the first half of the 20th century.

This exhibit was curated by Sheryln HayesZorn (Nevada Historical Society) and Patricia A. Atkinson (Nevada Arts Council Folklife Program), in consultation with the UNR Center for Basque Studies and Jean and Phillip Earl. MOUNTAIN PICASSOS: Basque Arborglyphs of the Great Basin is part of the Nevada Touring Initiative–Traveling Exhibition Program. It was funded in part by the National Endowment for the Arts and the Nevada State Legislature. The Nevada Arts Council is a division of the Department of Tourism and Cultural Affairs.



EXHIBIT PHOTOS


 

 

Western Nevada College Art Galleries

The arts are alive at Western Nevada College! Numerous art galleries feature a variety of works at Western Nevada College Carson City campus. Three exhibition spaces are located in the Bristlecone Building, featuring a continually rotating series of shows. The Main Gallery features paintings, sculptures, and other art works. The College Gallery is located on the main floor of the Bristlecone Building and features student and other art works. The Atrium gallery offers a brightly lit open space for art. Additional student galleries include the Harold LaVigne Art Wall in the Aspen Building, and an art wall in the Dini Student Center. All galleries are open to the public with free admission.

 

Hannah Gray has won the 1st Annual CCACC Scholarship

Hannah Gray has won the 1st Annual CCACC Scholarship

 

We are delighted to announce that the Carson City Arts & Culture Coalition [CCACC, also known as “the Coalition”] is providing a $500 college scholarship to a high school artist/a graduating senior who is going to college. CCACC  selected the winner from the work submitted from the Capital City Arts Initiative High School Pic[ks] show. Dayton High student, Hannah Gray, was awarded the scholarship for her “Bellow Yike” photograph.

Art is the most intense mode of individualism that the world has known.-

Oscar Wilde